Weaving is an arc welding technique which allows for filling a wide, flat joint or welding thick metals by adding a weave pattern to cover a larger surface area. It is achieved by offsetting the motion of the weld arc as it moves along the taught weld path.

The types of weaving patterns available for use are mentioned below -

  1. Triangle (Cross) Weave

  2. Whip Stitch (In-Line) Weave

Triangle (Cross) Weave

This weave method moves the weld arc in a triangle pattern perpendicular to the travel path.

The table below shows the weaving parameters available for a user for the triangle weave pattern:

Weave Settings

Units

About

Path Offset 1

mm

Peak amplitude of the upper half cycle of the triangle wave

Path Offset 2

mm

Peak amplitude of the lower half cycle of the triangle wave

Weave Frequency

Hz

Number of full waves per second

NOTE: While performing a triangle weave, the robot always begins the weave motion with the bottom half wave i.e., Path Offset 2.

Whip Stitch (In-Line) Weave

The Whip Stitch Weave is a technique used to produce the "Stack of dimes" effect in welding by solidifying the weld seam in intervals using a front to back movement of the torch along the path of travel.

Weave Settings

Units

About

Path Offset 1

mm

Reverse push distance along the weld path. Recommended to be set to 0mm

Path Offset 2

mm

Forward push distance along weld path. Best results seen between 5mm and 7mm

Weave Frequency

Hz

Number of cycles per second

Note: The Whip Stitch weave method is primarily used for better appearance purposes only.

How to Calculate the Pitch

The table below shows the relationship between the frequency of pulses and the visual pitch between weld dimes at a particular robot travel speed.

Example: If the frequency is set at 5Hz and the robot travel speed is set at 20 inches/min, the distance between dimes of the weld would be 0.067''.

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